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Safe Houses

400 Blake Street in 2004.

People have been moving houses—literally moving them–for hundreds of years, which may seem foundationally silly in today’s world.

But sometimes it’s the smartest move…

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This World, and the Next

It looks like a spaceship that touched down on Dixwell Avenue in the ’60s and never left. As you walk around it, the structure seems to change shape. Its cut-stone walls …

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Good Form

Wesley Kavanagh flipped a switch and illuminated a small city. It took me a moment to understand what I was seeing, or where in the world this was. …

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To Lay Out Fine Streets

Gain some insight into New Haven’s little green signs with these selections from Doris B. Townshend’s The Streets of New Haven: The Origin of Their Names.

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With Its Dignified New Name

Fair Haven before 1836

Learn how Fair Haven became Fair Haven in this excerpt from Doris B. Townshend’s Fair Haven: A Journey Through Time.

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Samuel Feels a Sting

Doris B. Townshend

Gain a glimpse into 18th-century New Haven with this excerpt from Townshend Heritage, a family and city history by Doris B. Townshend.

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History Repeated

Doris Townshend

In historian Doris B. Townshend’s last name, the silent “h” stands for history, literally. …

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Read All About It

It’s the last remaining “legacy” newspaper in the Elm City, the only one still published by pressing news ink to paper, then manually delivered to subscribers. It’s the New Haven Register, and, in one form or…

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New Haven’s Finest

John Driscoll circa 1892

“The oldest active sergeant… Unquestionable integrity, loyalty to his duty… Earned the utmost respect of every member of the department… Law-abiding citizens respect and honor this man, lawbreakers fear him… With Rooseveltian persistency…

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Flight over Water

"The Harmony" by Rodney Charman

Near the middle of the 19th century, ships would sail from America to Britain, carrying raw materials like timber. But when these same vessels returned, they’d become “coffin ships,” packed with …

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